Look Directly Into The Sun: China Pop 2007 (VA)

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Cover

Contents

General Information

Artist: Various Artists
Title: Look Directly Into The Sun: China Pop 2007
Release Date: 2007, August
Label: Invisible China Records
Type: CDDA
Catalog No.: IRC600 / 2007

Track Listing

  1. Snapline - Close Your Cold Eyes
  2. China MC Brothers - JaiJung
  3. Caffe-In - Mario And Peaches
  4. PK14 - Storm Eyes
  5. China Dub Soundsystem - Yellow Cab
  6. Joyside - Dang
  7. Tookoo - Take Me Home
  8. Subs - What More
  9. Hang On The Box - ShangHai
  10. White - Song 5
  11. Ruins - Love of Sun
  12. The Scoff - Nasty
  13. Demerit - Fight Your Apathy
  14. Queen Sea Big Shark - Hold The Line
  15. Honey Gun - Light
  16. Voodoo KungFu - Chian
  17. Carsick Cars - Panda
  18. Rococo - We Just Free


Reviews

... Atkins’ mix is an accessible look at the music in this large, far-reaching corner of the world, and he’s compiled a tracklist that has something to appeal to most everyone—even the small-minded listener will find the opening track, Snapline’s moody, post-punk “Close Your Cold Eyes”, compelling. The album ranges from China MC Brothers’ “Jaijung” rap-metal to the emo pop-punk of Tookoo’s “Take Me Home.” China Dub Soundsystem’s “Pink 09 - Determining the Dose” is a catchy high point, and the Subs’ “What More” ventures from pretty and melodic to vigorously hardcore and back again. Demerit’s “Fight Your Apathy” is quintessential punk rock, and the aforementioned, all-female Hang on the Box rock an experimental psychedelic song called “Shanghai.” While the album is anchored in expressive punk rock, Atkins has also rounded out his selections with a varied assortment: The Whites’ “Song 5” is an experimental, pedal-heavy composition, and Queen Sea Big Shark sings ambient indie rock. Ruins is represented here with a song called “Love Of Sun” that ventures into psychedelic territory, particularly intriguing when projected by these Eastern urbanites. “Chian”, by Voodoo Kungfu, is an industrial Goth song, and the compilation comes to an end with a great wall of sound via Carsick Cars’ “Panda” before Rococo’s all-girl, surfer pop wraps things up with “We Just Free.” ... - Angela Zimmerman (Crawdaddy)


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